Litter Box Challenges and Possible Solutions

March 6, 2019

Author: Melissa Sitzman

Cats are very peculiar about where they “do their business,” and there are many reasons your cat may end up going outside of the litter box. First and foremost, please understand that your cat doesn’t have it out for you! They aren’t doing it because you didn’t feed them their favorite food last night.

Most of the time it’s either a health problem or stress that causes a cat to eliminate outside of their designated area. That’s why the number one thing you should do (after you find a “present,” where it shouldn’t be), is take your cat to be seen by a veterinarian! Diabetes, arthritis, kidney disease, thyroid problems, poor eye sight, pain from being declawed, etc.. are just a hand full of the many ailments that could cause a cat to avoid their box.

Other things that should be considered are;

  • The location of the box – Is it in a location that offers privacy?
  • Other pets – Are they following the cat and disturbing them while in the box? Do they get along with each other?
  • Number of litter boxes – Do you know there should always be one more litter box, than there are cats?
  • Type of litter – Did you recently switch brands?
  • Changes in the household – What recent changes could have stressed your cat out? New baby? Having house guests? Did someone move in with you?
  • Changes in your life – Have you been spending less time at home? Did your work hours change? Have you been stressed out?

All of these things could lead a cat to urinate or defecate outside of the litter box. If your veterinarian doesn’t find anything wrong, health wise, then consider the list above and try to figure out what is causing it. You may even need to hire a behaviorist. Please don’t ever punish your pet for an accident outside of the box! This will only make the situation worse. Most of the time, if you can pinpoint the reason, you will be able to find a good solution that will put an end to it.

Here are some adjustments that I’ve had to make in my own house to help an aging cat and also because I have two cats that don’t get along. First, always protect the floor underneath and around litter boxes. If they are in carpeted areas, you may want to buy some of that clear plastic stuff that’s used over high traffic areas, to protect the carpet. Sorry, I’m not sure what its called! You could also use one of those clear mats that go under office chairs. I actually resorted to using clear plastic cupboard liner (not the adhesive kind).

After doing this, I realized that cats don’t really like walking on plastic! So, on top of that, I have indoor/outdoor carpet tiles (the kind with the thick rubber backing). These work really well! If someone misses the box, they can easily be cleaned or replaced. It’s much better than having to haul out the steam cleaner to steam the carpet in that room.

I have three litter boxes, for two cats. Two in a designated “cat room” and another at the opposite end of the house. There’s two in the cat room, just in case both cats end up in there, trying to do their dirty work, at the same time. The one at the other end of the house was put there because I realized that sometimes, one cat will try to “guard” the cat room. When this happens, the other cat has another option.

If you have a cat that consistently goes in one spot, away from the litter boxes, try putting a litter box there. Also, the best way to get rid of urine smell is by cleaning it up, with white vinegar! (Color test before using it, though.) If that doesn’t put a stop to the issue, try putting puppy pads there. Puppy pads are marvelous! They’re quick and easy to clean up and they protect the surface underneath them.

Now, last but not least, are the litter boxes, themselves, the issue? Some cats prefer covered boxes, others won’t go in them. Make sure the boxes you have are big enough and that they are kept clean. You should scoop them everyday and clean them out, entirely, every week. When you do so, don’t just dump all the litter. You should also be cleaning the box. Dish soap and a scrub sponge work well. This can be done in a bath tub, laundry room sink or even outside with a hose. Make sure to rinse well and dry before putting fresh litter in.

If you have an older cat, it’s a good idea to offer at least one box that has a lower side. That will make it easier for your cat to get in and out of the litter box. This was the issue in my house and it took me awhile to figure it out. Once I cut one of the sides of a litter box down, there were no more issues with going outside of the box. After that, I went and bought under the bed storage containers, removed the lids, cut down one of the longest sides on each of them and I now use those as litter pans!

I hope this information helps anyone who may be dealing with litter box issues. It may take some time to figure out what will work for you and your cat but, there’s always a solution and it shouldn’t be giving your cat up to a shelter!

Disclaimer: I’m not associated with or receiving compensation from any company who’s products I have mentioned in this post. I’m simply sharing what has worked for me and other cat parents that I know.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s